Capital LTE: “Elly Tierney’s betrayal on adequate public facilities”

Alderwoman Elly Tierney’s guest column on why she will renege on her pledge to vote for a school overcrowding law paralleling the county law is sadly full of deceit (The Capital, Feb. 16). Campaigning against incumbent Alderman Joe Budge in 2017, she pledged in writing that if elected, she would support and work to enact read on >

ACTION NEEDED: Express Input on Legislative Items Before the City Council

Please help us by sending a note to the Mayor and Council through our website on these two legislative issues: 1. Oppose R-49-18 to Reduce the Fee-in-Lieu of Replanting: This legislation threatens our ability to make sure the Crystal Spring developers are forced to replant trees cleared acre for acre. On November 19, we helped read on >

Capital LTE: “School Overcrowding”

I recently joined several other parents who spoke before the Annapolis City Council in support of a measure introduced by Aldermen Marc Rodriguez, Rob Savidge and Ross Arnett to strengthen the city’s law on school overcrowding. As a parent of two children in Anne Arundel County Public Schools and as a member of the Annapolis read on >

Capital LTE: “Annapolis needs to replace its ineffective Adequate Facilities Ordinance”

For far too long, city officials have willingly overlooked school overcrowding in favor of allowing more overdevelopment, which is why I was happy to hear the City Council is considering legislation to strengthen the law that restricts development when our schools can no longer accommodate new students. In 2016, the city passed a useless Adequate read on >

Please Support O-8-18 City School Overcrowding Ordinance!

The City Council is currently considering Ordinance O-8-18, which would strengthen the City’s Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance (APFO) as it applies to schools. We are asking residents to please support this important legislation with the two amendments described below. Residents have one final opportunity to provide public input on the legislation at the City Council read on >

Capital LTE: “City needs to strengthen its Adequate Public Facilities law”

We are parents of school-age children and residents of Hunt Meadow. Our mayor and several aldermen made campaign pledges regarding Crystal Spring and responsible development. We especially hope to see action soon on their promise to strengthen the city’s Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance, which restricts development when schools are overcrowded and can no longer accommodate read on >

Mayor and Aldermen Cave to Developers in Eviscerating School Overcrowding Ordinance

“Promises made, promises kept,” Mayor Pantelides wrote in his July 2016 Newsletter. “I told Annapolitans when I was campaigning for office that I would address overcrowding in area schools and this bill ensures that a school capacity test is included in our development application process for the first time in the city’s history. The goal read on >

The Capital: “City’s new development rules differ from county”

By: E.B. Fergurson III, Capital Gazette reporter The city’s new school enrollment rules for developers allow more students per school than the county regulations they are modeled after, but are more restrictive elsewhere. While the new rules, counting the number of students a project will generate against school enrollment capacity, do not seem to threaten read on >

The Capital: “City passes school capacity bill”

By: E.B. Fergurson III, Capital Gazette reporter The Annapolis City Council on Monday passed the city’s first school capacity test in order for developments to be approved. The legislation is designed to reduce residential development, or at least delay it, near crowded schools in the city, including the overcrowded Tyler Heights Elementary School. The city read on >

Save Our Schools: Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance Essentially Meaningless After Amendments

For decades the city has thumbed its nose at the county and allowed new residential development to add more students to overcapacity schools. Developers have blocked all attempts to pass a law parallel to the county’s that would prevent such developments from being approved for six years or until the school overcrowding is resolved. The read on >